Art and Architecture

Explore the Venetian

Love

A monumental artwork has arrived: Laura Kimpton’s LOVE. Bring a loved one and be inspired by this exclusive installation.

Renaissance Venice in Las Vegas

Founded in 421 A.D., Venice grew to become the center of a maritime republic and one of most influential cultural cities in the Mediterranean world. In a brash move to proclaim Venice’s arrival as a city on par with Rome, two Venetian merchants stole the relics of St. Mark the Evangelist from Alexandria in 828 A.D. The relics were received with great ceremony and housed in the newly built Basilica of San Marco in 832. With that, St. Mark had replaced St. Theodore as the patron saint of Venice. By the 16th century, Venice had colonized all of northeastern Italy and held a monopoly over Mediterranean trade.

"Acqua di Cristallo" in The Palazzo Lobby

Standing majestically in the center of The Palazzo Lobby, Samuel G. Bocchicchio’s “Acqua di Cristallo” is a unique water sculpture that has wowed visitors since its unveiling in 2008. Translucent carven women grace the sides of “Acqua di Cristallo” while water provides a coruscating effect that casts light all about the grand lobby of the hotel. This wonder of art and construction actually occupies two levels, with its base on the ground level of The Palazzo.

The Armillary Sphere at The Venetian

The Armillary Sphere of The Venetian is a grand reminder of the Renaissance spirit that guided the scholars and statesmen of Venice, Italy. This stunning recreation is the centerpiece of The Venetian lobby, and an inspiring window onto the artful craftsmanship that created it. Standing beneath the frescoed ceiling, the Armillary Sphere is a wonderful backdrop for photographs before heading into The Venetian proper.

The Campanile Tower at The Venetian

Perhaps the most iconic of all the landmarks of The Venetian Las Vegas, the Campanile Tower has a long and glorious history. One of the most famous events to take place in the Tower was Galileo demonstrating his new invention, a telescope, to the Doge of Venice.

The first construction of the Campanile Tower began in the ninth century. It was primarily used as a lighthouse for the docks near the Piazzetta. The Campanile Tower was finally completed in the 12th century, at which time the logetta was added to the base of the structure.

Throughout the intervening centuries, the Campanile Tower was rebuilt several times due to earthquakes or other disasters. In 1912, the Tower underwent its last reconstruction. This is the final iteration that has been etched into modern history and the version that was recreated here at The Venetian.

St. Mark’s Square

Dive into the history and architecture of the most famous area in Venice, St. Mark’s Few cities, ancient or modern, can claim such distinctive and historically important icons and constructions in such a relatively small area as can Venice, Italy with its St. Mark’s Square.  The handiwork and artistry of the Venetians of the Renaissance era left no canvas unpainted nor marble unchiseled.  And the most remarkable and noteworthy sights of Venice – the Bridge of Sighs, the Campanile Tower, the Rialto Bridge, the Doge’s Palace, and many others – are replete with intricate and fascinating details that tell the proud story of this ancient site of art, learning, and trade.

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